10% overhead specification

I set up my two nodes with the 10% overhead calculated on the real space.
So, my 3TB HDD has 2.7TB of real space and I allocated 2.7*0.9 ~= 2.4TB of space to the node. Similarly, I allocated 1.6TB for the 2TB (1.8TB real) node.

Now that one node is full I see that it has (a lot of) free space, so maybe I interpreted it wrong: is the 10% applied on the theoritical space? So, if I know that my HDD has 2.75TB of real free space I can set up the node to use 2.7TB, if it’s all free?

You might be able to go up to 2.5TB or 2.6TB but I would not go higher than that. The overhead is for the database files. Particularly during database migrations, you might need some extra free space to hold temporary data. Trying to cut it as close as possible is a recipe for hosing your database at some point in the future.

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True, I didn’t think about the database files. I could maybe increase it little by little and monitor the database files size but the database migrations would be a nasty variable to work with.

Thank you for the reply!

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No problem. I’ve done the same, increasing my storagenode capacity little by little. Instead of leaving 10%, I’m leaving 50-100GB free space. I don’t expect that the database files are going to grow larger than 50GB, at least not quickly. (I also have monitoring software on my nodes so I get alerts when free disk space falls below a threshold.)

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This is not only for databases. We are still in the Beta, the software could have bugs and node can overuse the allocated space (as was in the UPDATE: the SNO Garbage Collection & Disqualification bug has been fixed for example)

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Increasing that will not have a huge impact on your profit, if you increase 2.4T to 2.5T or. 2.6T is will take some days or weeks, and they you will be full again, and you will risk your entire node. is it worth it? It does not make sense.
Add another node instead and leave the one you have

Your 3TB hdd has 2.7TiB of space, which most OS’s unhelpfully display with the wrong unit. You will probably be fine assigning 2.7TB.

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